Friday newspaper round-up: Consumer concerns, Brexit M&A, migration, SFO

Digital Look Sharecast | 19 May, 2017 10:16 - Updated: 11:16 | | |

noticias

British consumers are bracing themselves for an expensive and uncertain post-Brexit future, with four out of five fearing price rises on household essentials such as food, drink and clothing, a survey has revealed. Eighty-three percent of Britons admit they are concerned about price hikes in goods and services, while 59% are most worried about the soaring cost of groceries, according to a poll for Mintel’s 27th annual British Lifestyles report. Spiralling holiday costs are a concern for 35%, with 26% fearing higher prices for clothing and shoes. - Guardian

Almost 900 UK companies have been bought out by overseas businesses since the pound fell after the EU referendum in June, underlining their vulnerability to foreign buyers. There were almost 950 takeovers of UK companies by international rivals in 2016, of which more than half followed the Brexit vote. That was the joint highest number since at least 1995, according to Dealogic, the financial analytics company. - The Times

Four carmakers, including Toyota and BMW, have agreed to pay $553m (£425m) to settle class-action lawsuits covering owners of recalled vehicles, fitted with potentially faulty Takata airbags. The settlement addressed claims from the owners of almost 16 million recalled vehicles, and will resolve economic losses of vehicle owners and lessees, including reimbursing them the cost of replacement vehicles while waiting for the airbags to be fixed. - Telegraph

The British economy needs a net inward migration flow of 200,000 people a year, double the Conservative target, if it is to avoid the “catastrophic economic consequences” linked to Brexit, a study by an employer-backed thinktank has said. The Global Future report says the UK’s low productivity, ageing population and shortage of labour in key areas, such as the NHS, show that net migration of 200,000 will be needed annually. - Guardian

The Bank of England's failure to raise interest rates could stoke consumer debt and put millions of households at risk, a former member of the Monetary Policy Committee has warned. Speaking to building societies ahead of last week's decision to keep the Bank Rate on hold at 0.25 per cent once again, Andrew Sentance criticised the committee's failure to sufficiently debate the merits of a rate rise. Sentance said: "I have been rather disappointed by the way in which the MPC has handled inflation because I think that it seems they don’t have a long-term strategy." - Mail

British companies will be protected from foreign buyers who do not have their best interests at heart under proposals contained in the Conservative manifesto. The document said that the party “believes in the rights of business owners” and “wants Britain to be a global nation that is competitive, outward-looking and open for business... which welcomes overseas investors”. - Telegraph

Theresa May has pledged to abolish the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) as she seeks to overhaul how white collar crime is tackled in Britain. In the Conservative Party manifesto, the Prime Minister said she would fold the organisation into the National Crime Agency (NCA) if she wins the general election. - Mail

Deutsche Bank said it expects former board members to pay substantial sums for misconduct that tarnished the reputation of Germany’s biggest lender. Paul Achleitner, its chairman, said the supervisory board and two committees were discussing the need for “personal and collective responsibility” and that the bank had sought legal advice. - The Times

The recruiter that supplied workers for Sports Direct’s distribution complex in Derbyshire has gone into administration and immediately been sold. Transline, which took £20 million a year from Mike Ashley’s company for workers to pack goods ordered online, served notice last month of its intention to appoint administrators and on Thursday night was sold to an offshoot of Russell Taylor, the recruitment specialist. - The Times

A part-time nurse has been warned she could face legal action over comments she made in her Tripadvisor review of a country house restaurant in Kent. Lawyers representing High Rocks, a picturesque wedding venue in Tunbridge Wells, sent Sarah Gardner an 11-page letter — followed later by a 14-page letter — accusing her of libel after she wrote on the online travel website that staff at the restaurant were “rude” and “arrogant”, and that the food was “mediocre at best”. She gave the venue a one-star rating. - The Times

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